Try a L’Oréal make-up selfie before you buy

It makes sense since many people are now ‘trying’ out brands online before they even go in-store.  At the end of the day, it’s all about a brand being ‘present’ whenever and wherever a potential consumer could be.

Luxury Hotel-Restaurants and Twitter

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I was recently at Park Hyatt to try the winter truffle tasting menu (pictured above).  It was highly recommended so after dessert and while still at the restaurant-hotel I decided to tweet my review mentioning their Twitter account which you can read below the screenshot:image

I was really surprised about the very quick response from the Social Media Manager and also pleased that they forwarded the review to the chef Franck Detrait.  Not only that but, if you read the topmost tweet, he also favourited it soon after when we were still at the restaurant.  

I really love the instant communications.  Even without Twitter I would have forwarded my thoughts to the waitress anyway and I did actually show her the Twitter exchange.  It is always nice to do it on Twitter because you also have the opportunity to share your thoughts out to the wider public.

I definitely want to give kudos for the luxury brand to be super interactive on Twitter and for a chef to be on it as well! I also follow a few chefs on social media.  My favourite is the French chef Hélène Darroze whom I decided to follow after I went to her Mayfair hotel-restaurant The Connaught.  She has a very active, candid and authentic Instagram account showing her lives between London-Paris and behind the scenes of being a Michelin chef.

Anyway so Park Hyatt isn’t the only one! Here are just a few more examples from other leading brands below:

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It is always really nice to receive a nice message and to have pleasant conversations on social media - remember that the people who run these accounts are human as well!

Also I had an upgrade at Radisson Blu and I wonder if it’s social media related? Hmm ;)

Rise of the Luxury Haul Videos

I remember coming across my first haul video.  This was by an American staying in Europe describing her latest shopping haul in a YouTube video (it tends to be YouTube) several minutes long.  She had thousands of likes and subscribers and upon seeing her channel she has done numerous haul videos before.

I decided to make my first video after purchasing Le Voyage de Pytheas by Hermès.  I decided to use a high definition Samsung Galaxy Android digital camera - yes this camera had apps including Instagram!  I took the short video above using the Instagram’s video sharing app which allows you to take multiple clips but constrained in a length of no more than 30 seconds.  The video above is my second try.  

Haul videos are a bit of an interesting social phenomenon that comes part and parcel with mobiles, the selfie culture, social media and blogging.  It’s not just constrained to fashion or beauty as I have seen other haul videos on other products from technology or toys.  It seems that no matter what it is, there is always a group of people who share the same interests as you.  

3D Printing and the Luxury Industry
A mini demo I saw in action at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona was a 3D printer printing out Nokia Lumia covers using a special type of plastic material.  3D printing in the luxury industry is a technology still yet to take off.  It’s interesting because on one side there is the argument of 3D printing democratising manufacturing but there is also scope for the luxury industry in terms of bespoke products and personalisation.

3D Printing and the Luxury Industry

A mini demo I saw in action at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona was a 3D printer printing out Nokia Lumia covers using a special type of plastic material.  3D printing in the luxury industry is a technology still yet to take off.  It’s interesting because on one side there is the argument of 3D printing democratising manufacturing but there is also scope for the luxury industry in terms of bespoke products and personalisation.

Paris Art + Design was an interesting mix of gallerists specialising in jewellery, antiques, sculpture, and furniture.  One of my standouts was Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design from the Netherlands.  One of their items on show (not pictured above) was a touch-sensitive technology using large LCD screens hooked up to sensors with a computer running bespoke software behind the scenes.  I’ve seen something similar in action but was a large commissioned public work using Xbox Kinect technology.  
Human to machine interaction encapsulated in beauty and curiosity - could this be the future of luxe interior decorating?

Paris Art + Design was an interesting mix of gallerists specialising in jewellery, antiques, sculpture, and furniture.  One of my standouts was Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design from the Netherlands.  One of their items on show (not pictured above) was a touch-sensitive technology using large LCD screens hooked up to sensors with a computer running bespoke software behind the scenes.  I’ve seen something similar in action but was a large commissioned public work using Xbox Kinect technology.  

Human to machine interaction encapsulated in beauty and curiosity - could this be the future of luxe interior decorating?